- Fuel cell electric buses are hybrid electric buses using fuel cells and batteries to power the electric motor(s).

- The fuel cell uses hydrogen and oxygen to generate electricity by an electro-chemical process producing only heat and water as a by-product (no harmful emissions).  The heat can be used again to warm the passenger compartment, such that as little energy as possible is lost in the process.

- The hydrogen is safely stored on-board in gaseous storage tanks on the roof.

- The energy storage devices (such as a battery or ultra-capacitor) are included to improve performance and fuel efficiency.

- The bus structure and other non-electric components are the same as the ones of conventional buses.

- Hydrogen offers much higher energy density compared to electrical storage systems (e.g. batteries, super-capacitors), this leads to a substantial driving range for the buses (more   than sufficient for a day’s operation). FCEB’s can be operated up to 16 hours a day, in all climate conditions.

- In the fuel cell hybrid bus, the fuel cell produces directly the electric power for the electric motor and/or to recharge the batteries. In addition, both types allow, through a process called regenerative braking, to recover energy lost due to braking to be utilized to charge the battery. Also called brake energy recuperation.

- Fuel cell electric buses hybrid are electric buses 

- A hybrid vehicle uses two or more distinct types of power, such as:

  • an internal combustion engine and batteries or ultracapacitors in diesel hybrid vehicles.
  • a fuel cell and batteries in fuel cell hybrid vehicles.
  • an overhead electric (catenary) line and batteries in trolley hybrid buses.

- There are two different types of hybrid systems

  • parallel and series hybrids.